Composite nails are fantastic

I just strip planked a 16' cedar canoe with RAPTOR composite nails.

The nails did not have to be removed; they sanded smooth and help the strips better than metal nails.

I'll never use steel nails again!

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Boat Building for Free

by Chris
(Leicester UK)

I'm building a boat for free as I'm using thing I have found discarded.

This is true and as a skilled rigger and engineer I must add that anyone can do this so go on get the boat done free!!!

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Water Splashing up the Centerboard Trunk of Dinghy

IF you have water splashing up your centerboard trunk cut a length of Swim Noodle split it tie a small string around the center and shove in the slot the string is for removing.

It worked for me

Capt Ron Hermitage, Tennessee.

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splash gard
by: Anonymous cal

i had the same problem simple fix but perment got a car inertube cut a four inch strip out fasend to the bottom of hull cut slit with rasor that did it for me cal




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Test

by Test
(Test)

Test

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28' Carver Yacht Website

by Tim
(Endicott, WA)


But there is a lot of great info for any boat.

Paul Mitchell, from the province of Quebec, Canada shares his for passion Carver boats, especially the mid 1970's, Carver Mariner 28 models with other owners and enthusiasts.

Read how his love affair for Carver Mariner 28's all started.

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The beginning of wisdom is a firm grasp of the obvious...

by Don
(NE Victoria, Australia)

Over the years, I've boiled it down to just a few lines.

They come from production engineering, but they apply widely...

Preventing troublesome designs:

* Avoid complexity wherever possible.

* Seek simple ways to prevent assembly errors.

* Minimise the number of different types of components.

* Know the limits of your production capabilities and design in margins for error.

Happy building, and smooth sailing!

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Evolution...
by: jobi64

Last week my girlfriend refused to go out because she didn’t install her winter tires and the garage could only take her in 3 days…

It was nice outside and I had some old tire irons, soap and air pump…

I’d never done this by hand before but figured someone has done it before?

It took me less than 2h to jack the car and change all tires…

Took the car for a test ride and it seem well balanced (no vibrations)

I believe it is counter evolution to limit yourself to things you know…

Sometimes I may not be as imaginative as others but these are the times when I can copy them…

Nothing shameful about following the road our peers have paved before us.

Those words of wisdom you posted would make Darwin laugh and Freud angry… as for me at 47

I’ve learned to give and take…I go by gut feeling and my only limitations are from my own laziness.





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Chinese metal protection

by Darrell
(UK)

This remedy works on old rusted shackles and metals not galvanised.

Heat item to blood red temperature then using a thin wire hook dip the item into a tub of pre-melted pitch.

Shackles are best done with the pin fitted.

It must have been the first type of metal protection for Junks!

***C2Add2.shtml***



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I did it this way!
by: Darrell

I used a wire brush to remove most of the rust, heated and dipped as described, the result is a fairly thin coating that is firmly fixed to the metal.

A very nice black finish that is hard wearing and weatherproof apart from where the shackle is in contact with any moving part.

Pitch I suppose you may know as Coal Tar used on the road surfaces mixed with chippings.

Also used to seal seams in wooden decks in the old days.

Post your results.





What is the Result?
by: Al

What does the surface of the dipped part look like?

Can the part have surface rust prior to dipping.

Is pitch and tar the same substance?

I'm just asking, you know...






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