refinishing/repairing bottom of wooden boat

by Scot
(Atlanta, Ga)

Hi all, I just acquired a beautiful looking 1959 Century resorter and being new to wooden boats I need some advice on getting her back into good order ( ... by new I mean this is my very first wooden boat).

The boat has been sitting in an air conditioned garage for about 8-10 years maybe --

I was told I need to "soak" it before taking her out(??).

Also the boat appears to be in good shape overall with the exception of what appears to be some 'slight' damage from possibly running a ground or over something --- from the front to about 5 feet along the keel exposing the wood, with a slight gouge ( in the wood) of approx 5-6 inches where it stopped.

It appears to have some rot/decay in that area ( small gouge) but does not appear to be all the way through the board ( attempted to check hull from inside and did not see any holes or rot from inside).

Anyway it would seem in best interests to refinish the hull and fix any possible damage, the bottom finish does look a little worn --top side ( above water line) looks pretty good for her age but not sure if it has ever been restored by previous owners.

All advice welcome.

Also the boat has the original inline 6cylinder "Gray Marine" engine that appears okay (turns over with wrench at crank), but I don't seem to be able find much information about this engine -- a lot about 8cyl but not much about the inline 6's......any advice there?

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Resorter Question
by: Mike

Assuming that she still has her original bottom and considering that she has been in the dry for so long, then she will want some soaking to allow the planks to ’take up’ before you launch her.

Some restorations have had the original bottom replaced with a 5200 double bottom.

But first, while the planking is still dry, see to any painting and repairs.

That slight gouge, if it is only slight could be filled with some thickened epoxy, then faired off, clean it out to get rid of any soft wood first.

As she has been kept dry for so long, she is unlikely to have any rot.


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