PENOBSCOT 14 LAPSTRAKE WITH ROTTEN GARBOARD

by Edward Mordis
(Boynton Beach,fl. USA)

I built this boat with 1/4 marine plywood but neglected to observe the garboard that became moist and rotted.

The piece I have removed is 12 inches long and 4 inches wide.

Thought of making a template with luan and attaching new marine plywood with epoxy but am not sure this is the right approach.

Any suggestions would be most appreciated.

Ed



Comments for PENOBSCOT 14 LAPSTRAKE WITH ROTTEN GARBOARD

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rotten garboard
by: Anonymous

Sorry . Haven't made myself clear enough.

I am suggesting it is possible to make up your own ply in situ using solid timber strips.

You will never get as many layers as the ply manufacturers but that doesn't really matter for what you are doing here.

I have just done an almost impossible plank on a 1932 mahogany yacht using this technique.

The plank was 16mm thick which I made up of four layers 3mm thick and the final layer 5mm to allow for finishing.

The first layer pinned in place and the second added immediately with epoxy being the glue.

Next day third layer etc

You can pin every layer it wont hurt, but I scotched the second layer on with short bits of wood from adjacent surfaces.

Finished result can't be told from solid wood.

Choose your wood according to your local supplies.

Sorry I can't help you there.

Hope this has been of some help.


PENOBSCOT 14 LAPSTRAKE WITH ROTTEN GARBOARD
by: Anonymous

your comment "Cut a nice long scarf and lay in the leaves as thin as you can, pin the first layer in place with copper panel pins which will stay in place and then go layer on layer until you reach the desired thickness or slightly more."...

I am using 1/4 inch marine plywood-could you be more detailed on just how layers are done?(if layers of 1/4 plywood are layered it appears enclosure will not be in same plane as existing structure)...
in my mind I don't see what you are suggesting...

Ed


rotten garboard
by: Anonymous

Contrary to everything you will ever hear me say in this case epoxy probably is a sound approach.

The reason I normally rant against epoxy in wooden boats is its total lack of flexibility.

It kills wood in the worst possible way.

Ten times worse than rot.

However here we have a plywood boat which in terms of wood movement is much more likely to live with the great god epoxy.

I would go one further and suggest it should be possible to laminate the repair in situ.

Cut a nice long scarf and lay in the leaves as thin as you can, pin the first layer in place with copper panel pins which will stay in place and then go layer on layer until you reach the desired thickness or slightly more.

Epoxy will work well here.

I have done similar projects which are easier when she can be turned upside down to work on her.

Good luck


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