Hull refinishing

by Evan

I have a 1942 Snipe that was my grandfathers.

It had been sitting for a number of years and this past summer I let her swell in a pond for a week and half, at which time it seemed like she swelled tightly.

After a few outings, it was apparent that maybe it was time to re-caulk.

At this stage I have her hull sanded and the old cotton pulled.

My questions involve what products are recommended for finishing the job; Prime the seems with an oil based paint (any recommendations for this?), use cotton caulking (I've come across a number of techniques- any good suppliers?), I saw that Pettit EZ primer is good to use on the hull itself.

What about to fill the seems (linseed oil and red-lead putty? - any alternatives?).

And finally any recommendations for actually bottom paint?


Comments for Hull refinishing

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Mar 09, 2015
by: Eric Smith

Evan, I owned a snipe sailboat a few years ago, It was built in ? 1930S >.

I remember it was like hull # 7, or something.

Live in Houston. call me 832-468-2082.


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