Dinghy Mooring

Dinghy or tender mooring, can be a problem where the access is restricted, especially if you are planning to leave it for a while yet want to leave access clear for others.

Both methods require a small anchor or grapnel and a long painter or mooring line.

They are also useful for keeping your tender clear of any rocks or stone harbour walls that are likely to damage it.

Method One

This one is especially useful when using narrow harbour steps or ladders.

dinghy mooring

As you approach the landing drop the anchor over the over the stern.

It is best if it is dropped roughly in line with and a reasonable distance off.

Pay out the anchor rode until alongside the landing then make it fast on board.

Step ashore while keeping hold of the long painter or mooring line.

This can then be secured to a cleat or bollard to one side of the landing, thus pulling the tender to one side of and away from the landing area.

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Dinghy Mooring Method Two

This method can be used virtually anywhere.

It is particularly useful for mooring off a shore line.

grapnel anchor

With this method the shore or tripping line is tied to the crown of the anchor or grapnel.

The idea being that when you want to recover the tender, pulling on the shore line will trip the anchor, this can then be pulled ashore and the dinghy with it.

As the boat is going to be held by the anchor there isn't the need for the shore line to be tied to a mooring cleat.

It could be tied to a rock or a stick shoved into the sand, just so long as it will still be there and findable when you return.

dinghy tender mooring on a beach

So, once ashore measure out sufficient anchor rode, flake it so it will run out freely, and don't forget to secure the bitter end to the tender.

Flake the shore line so it too will run out freely.

Tie one end of the shore line to the crown of the anchor and keep hold of or secure the other end.

Balance the anchor or grapnel on the bow of the dinghy with the flukes hanging overboard.

beach mooring a tender

Push the tender off, when it is a suitable distance away a sharp tug on the shore line should tip the anchor overboard.

Allow the anchor to set with some slack in the shore/tripping line.

Then secure the shore end of the tripping line where it can be found on your return.

"Cruising has two pleasures.
One is to go out in wider waters from a sheltered place.
The other is to go into a sheltered place from wider waters."
(Howard Bloomfield)

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